Today’s print edition of the Washington Post has an article in the Style & Arts section, “Last Impressions – When It’s All Going Down the Tube, What Stuff Sticks Around to the End?” It verge on fluff but raises interesting and serious ideas.

Among the last things to go in the Depression was — lipstick.

“It was not particularly expensive, but it was a prized possession,” says Jeremy E. Adamson, director for collections and services at the Library of Congress. “You feel bad anyway, but you make yourself look a little bit better. It says, ‘I care about myself.’ Those little things are terribly important.”

The article notes that the scholarship on the subject of last possessions is scanty because most research in the field is regarding consumerism and acquisition of objects.

What I found most interesting is the juxtaposition of this article with the advertisement that appears on the same page – an ad for what is proclaimed to be “the first feel-good film of the year,” Confessions of a Shopaholic.

I typed the URL the ad gives for the movie – shopaholicmovie.com – into my browser and it redirected to bluefly.com, a popular discount-designer label shopping site, which I suppose really is the most logical place to host the movie’s website.

In the process of switching this section over so that it is run by blogger. I can already tell there are going to be bumps in the road, so please have patience.

While I iron this out, we must keep in mind that things could be much much worse for us. We could be like the poor souls in New York City. You may be asking, what poor souls?

The tragedy came to my attention via and article in the Washington Post online, which also appears on the front page of the day’s edition. “New York Gets Over a Gilt Complex”, April 24, 2001 [ed. note: dead link deleted]

Some people in New York are suffering and you can help. We need to put on a benefit concert and raise a lot of money because things sound pretty desperate. We have an obligation to help them.

See for yourself. Take the case of poor Paul Harris:

His personal fortune is down to $1.5 million and he’s leaving for an ashram in India. “I really need to reconnect,” he said. “This dream’s over.”

How shocking is that? Is Yanni available? How about Kenny G and perhaps the Mannheim Steamroller? We’ve got to help these people, damnit.

It gets worse:

“It’s the summer season coming up, so my patients must have tune-ups,” said plastic surgeon Pamela Lipkin, who has a state-of-the-art private operating room on Fifth Avenue. “But instead of doing liposuction on seven areas, they’re doing three or four. These decisions are so painful.”

Oh, the horror. The horror. Okay, so to be honest the article is mostly about the question of whether the stock market fluctuations will have wider-reaching implications. Those quotes were just too good to pass up. I do want to add that I feel pretty bad for the people who have had to sell off most of their jets. I don’t know what Husband and I would do if we had to restrict ourselves to just one Lear Jet.

plucked from the ashes of the punkprincess.com archives, reposted 02-23-07

[this entry was posted during a software switchover]

While we iron this out, we must keep in mind that things could be much much worse for us. We could be like the poor souls in New York City. You may be asking, what poor souls?

The tragedy came to my attention via and article in the Washington Post online, which also appears on the front page of the day’s edition. “New York Gets Over a Gilt Complex” (April 24, 2001).

Some people in New York are suffering and you can help. We need to put on a benefit concert and raise a lot of money because things sound pretty desperate. We have an obligation to help them.

See for yourself. Take the case of poor Paul Harris:

His personal fortune is down to $1.5 million and he’s leaving for an ashram in India. “I really need to reconnect,” he said. “This dream’s over.”

How shocking is that? Is Yanni available? How about Kenny G and perhaps the Mannheim Steamroller? We’ve got to help these people, damnit.

It gets worse:

“It’s the summer season coming up, so my patients must have tune-ups,” said plastic surgeon Pamela Lipkin, who has a state-of-the-art private operating room on Fifth Avenue. “But instead of doing liposuction on seven areas, they’re doing three or four. These decisions are so painful.”

Oh, the horror. The horror. Okay, so to be honest the article is mostly about the question of whether the stock market fluctuations will have wider-reaching implications. Those quotes were just too good to pass up. I do want to add that I feel pretty bad for the people who have had to sell off most of their jets. I don’t know what Husband and I would do if we had to restrict ourselves to just one Lear Jet.